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News and views from our members.
Views expressed do not necessarily represent those of the Urban Design Forum or its supporting institutes.


UDF submission on the Auckland City Centre Masterplan

UDF in support of the proposed refresh

  • 29 October 2019
  • Author: Kamelia Haydon
  • Number of views: 244
  • 0 Comments
UDF submission on the Auckland City Centre Masterplan

The 2020 City Centre Masterplan (CCMP) refresh closed for consultation on Friday 18th October. Urban Design Forum put forward a submission on behalf of their committee and membership in support of the CCMP update and the Access for Everyone proposal. 

Overall, UDF was in support of the proposed refresh of the City Centre Masterplan. 

We believe that this is an important document providing vision and direction for the delivery of a quality built outcome and an inclusive, prosperous and accessible heart of Tāmaki Makaurau for all residents and visitors. 

We were pleased to see that the first Transformational Move is focused on Maori outcomes, and appreciated the strong alignment between the Auckland Plan and the CCMP’s Future Outcomes. 

Our recommendations gave direction on how we create an accessible and equitable city centre for all socio-economic backgrounds, asked that CCMP showcase what has been delivered to date with metrics, suggested strategies that ensure the delivery of the masterplan, and asked for clear alignment on how Access for Everyone manifests through the Transformational Moves. 

We hope that our submission helps Auckland Council further the development of the City Centre Masterplan and Access for Everyone, as they have the ability to empower, strengthen and unlock the potential of Tāmaki’s centre. 

You can read our full submission here

Download Auckland Council's 2020 CCMP - 10 Strategic outcomes of the City Centre Masterplan Refresh


 

Are we missing something in Public Space Design?

how can we design better public spaces?

Are we missing something in Public Space Design?
In the process of re-urbanising our cities to be more suited for people, public spaces have become a key component of many regeneration and redevelopment schemes. Active public spaces are a vital ingredient for liveable cities, thriving economy and socially cohesive society. To improve the quality of public space design, place-making principles of human-centred design and stakeholder engagement are increasingly being advocated. There are many place-making design guidelines and books on how to design spaces that are meaningful, adaptable and well-used. However, something doesn’t seem to be working. Shopping streets are continually redeveloped to re-invigorate them and initially popular shiny new public spaces turn into places-less spaces after a few years, despite including everything communities have requested? What is it that we are missing when designing public realm, and how can we design better public spaces?

 

Ellie Craft’s mode biases presentation from the Transportation Group New Zealand Conference 2019

  • 13 June 2019
  • Author: Ellie Craft
  • Number of views: 1477
  • 0 Comments
Ellie Craft’s mode biases presentation from the Transportation Group New Zealand Conference 2019
In March I attended the 2019 Transportation Group New Zealand Conference “the changing face of transport”. I left conference feeling that the transport industry understands the need to enable sustainable transport and is taking action to deliver it. I also spoke on mode bias, meaning the inherent bias towards the needs of motor vehicle users. Here are some excerpts from my conference presentation with notes on complementary points picked up at conference! 
 
 What is car dependency?
 Conscious car dependency is when people with modal choice consciously choose to drive. Structural car dependency is due to lack of choice. Mode shift barriers can be caused by hard factors such as time and cost or soft factors such as status around the mode and the quality of the travel experience.
 Mode biases exist in policy, laws, taxes, budget allocation, language, culture and design and investment assessment tools. These all need to be addressed.

Council approves a pedestrian-friendly Auckland CBD

Access for Everyone

  • 17 January 2019
  • Author: Ellie Craft
  • Number of views: 1668
  • 0 Comments
Council approves a pedestrian-friendly Auckland CBD
The Auckland Planning Committee voted unanimously for an innovative project that will pedestrianise the Auckland City Centre on 27 November 2018. 

The Access for Everyone is a bold project that will reshuffle the priority of CBD road space to different transport users. 

 



Universal Design: 5 ways to improve accessibility in cities

“By the time you reach the age of 105, the probability of you dying starts to go down.”

  • 29 November 2018
  • Author: Richard Voss
  • Number of views: 2560
  • 0 Comments
Universal Design: 5 ways to improve accessibility in cities
New research data such as this from the Sapienza University of Rome shows that due to demographic changes, the new accessibility design codes are out of date by the time the ink has dried. We are living for longer, re-entering the work force after retirement, setting up new businesses in our sixties, doing post graduate studies in our seventies, and so on. Today we are “actively ageing”.  The data on the needs of our changing population is clear. In the next 10 years the New Zealand population over the age of 65 will increase from 16% to 20%. Therefore, the provision of accessible assets in our urban environments will need to increase. Here I recommend five ways we can improve accessibility in the built environment, so we are future-ready.

 

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