Search
× Search
Franklin Centre Te Puke Heritage Plaza  Jean Batten Place  Proposed apartments, Wynyard Quarter Proposed apartments, Wynyard Quarter

The Forum:


News and views from our members.
Views expressed do not necessarily represent those of the Urban Design Forum or its supporting institutes.


An evening in Rauora Park

A visit to new the Christchurch central city residential development

  • 28 February 2018
  • Author: Jeanette Ward
  • Number of views: 1004
  • 0 Comments
An evening in Rauora Park

At the start of the walk we sheltered in the shade of a building while Pete Mathews and Cameron McLean from Ōtākaro provided an overview of the project, we then set off on a walk along the length of Rauora Park.  Rau can mean ‘leaves’, ‘greenery’, ‘many’ and ‘gathering’, while Ora indicates health and wellbeing.  The landscaping is a mix of both exotic, native and fruit trees/orchards and the terrain has undulations to add interest.  The space also features outdoor entertainment areas where power and water has been provided in each block for events and activities.  The recent opening event allowed these spaces to be used creatively.  Over time it will be enhanced by cafés and restaurants. 

High density residential development being built by Fletcher Living will flank the park.  The development has been branded as ‘One Central’ and the first block underway is the Latimer Terraces as can be seen in the background of the photographs.  There will eventually be 900 town houses and apartments, so about 2000 people, in a series of connected neighbourhoods.  The location within the central city means residents really are in the thick of the action in terms walking distance to a key employment area, fantastic entertainment options, access to public transport being near the Bus Interchange and are directly adjacent to a key public corridor (Manchester Street).  I am not sure how affordable this housing will be, and therefore how quickly it will progress, but I hope this development succeeds and achieves a balanced demographic not just people who think it would be a great place to live when the kids leave home!

The park features a north-south shared space laneway that intersects with four east-west streets.  The residential dwellings will only have vehicle access from these east-west streets, not via the shared lane.  The laneway is called Huanui, which in mana whenua local dialect means ‘pathway’.  To the east of the laneway, on the other side of the greenspace is a shared path.  The lane and the shared path essentially form the bones of the park and that over time it will morph to match its changing environment.  The shared space laneway is not yet open to traffic but was busy with people walking and cycling home from work.  There are some indented parking spaces that will offer short term paid parking once the lane is opened. 

Gap Filler is a key part of the East Frame.  Their primary role is to facilitate other groups to realise temporary, community-minded projects on the East Frame land, and then to ‘fill in the gaps’ with some of Gap Filler’s own original projects.  One the things I learnt that evening was that one of the pay and display car parks on the west side of the East Frame is a community-run car park (Good Spot), where all the proceeds support community activities in the neighbourhood– what a great idea!  


The evening concluded at the Dux Central where most people stayed on for a drink and pizza.  The mix of transport and urban design created some great conversations and new connections were made.  This is the third joint city ‘walkabout’ event that the groups have held and I am sure there will be many more!
The evening concluded at the Dux Central where most people stayed on for a drink and pizza.  The mix of transport and urban design created some great conversations and new connections were made.  This is the third joint city ‘walkabout’ event that the groups have held and I am sure there will be many more!The evening concluded at the Dux Central where most people stayed on for a drink and pizza.  The mix of transport and urban design created some great conversations and new connections were made.  This is the third joint city ‘walkabout’ event that the groups have held and I am sure there will be many more!The evening concluded at the Dux Central where most people stayed on for a drink and pizza.  The mix of transport and urban design created some great conversations and new connections were made.  This is the third joint city ‘walkabout’ event that the groups have held and I am sure there will be many more!

Print
Categories: Auckland, Christchurch
Tags:

Jeanette WardJeanette Ward

Other posts by Jeanette Ward

Contact author

Leave a comment

Name:
Email:
Comment:
Add comment

Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message:
x

Search

Terms Of UsePrivacy StatementCopyright 2018 by Urban Design Forum